Tree Location Survey

South Kent School, Kent, CT

Leaching Requirements:
25,538.15 sq. ft. Area: 59,400 sq. ft.

Models:
Contactor®100

Number of Units:
1,164

Installed:
October 2012

Project Engineer:
DYMAR, Corp. Southbury, CT

Contractor:
HLC Excavation,
LLC Woodbury, CT

South Kent School

 

DYMAR of Southbury, CT, installs new SSDS to handle the school’s sewage flow needs. They chose to use over 1,100 CULTEC Contactor 100 plastic subsurface leaching chambers arranged in a side-by-side configuration in 56 rows.

South Kent School is a college preparatory school for boys in grades nine through 12, nestled in the hills of picturesque northwestern Connecticut. The facility houses dormitories, classrooms, a gymnasium, a hockey rink, several athletic fields and a library. In recent years, the school has seen an expansion of its student and faculty population, creating a need for the facility to expand as well. In an analysis of the existing subsurface sewage disposal system (SSDS), it was determined that the population currently generates an estimated 15,000 gallons of sewage per day (GPD) and the existing system would not be able to handle the projected future “ow of 18,300 GPD. Engineers from DYMAR, Corp. of Southbury, CT, believed that a new SSDS would need to be constructed to handle the school’s sewage “ow needs. They chose to use over 1,100 CULTEC Contactor 100 plastic subsurface leaching chambers arranged in a side-by-side con!guration in 56 rows. Each chamber measures 8″ x 36” x 12.5″and has an e#ective leaching area of 5.90 SF/ft. The chambers have repeating support panels to add strength, feature a patented overlapping rib connection and have a greater contact with the primary leaching

area, which promotes maximum infiltration. Located beneath the school’s existing lower athletic field, which is being reconstructed into a regulation-size soccer field, the system covers 4,329 linear feet of trenching, 8,658 linear feet of CULTEC Contactor 100 chambers, occupying a surface of area of 59,400 sq. ft. The subsurface chambers are being used for storage and dispersion of sewage effluent as it seeps into the native soils after conventional treatment to recharge the groundwater. In addition, there are approximately 240 linear feet of chambers being used as infiltration rechargers for the surface drainage of the soccer field and to provide nitrogen dilution. All of the chambers were placed on native material, and processed stone was placed above and on the sides of the chambers and topped off with common fill and topsoil. A traditional septic system consists of a solid pipe from the building structure, the septic tank, a drain field and soil treatment. The school’s system is comprised of gravity collection piping from numerous buildings and pretreatment septic tanks. Sewage water flows from the tanks to a centralized effluent pump station and meter pit that doses the CULTEC chambers using an electromagnetic flow meter to regulate valves and the flow controller. These flows are based on preset daily volumes to individual dispersal cells based on real time that is adjusted for temperature change for greater accountability of the flow. The metered flows are transmitted from a data logger to desktop computer and meter software that is customized for the school to obtain greater flow control, operational efficiencies and reporting to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental

area, which promotes maximum infiltration. Located beneath the school’s existing lower athletic field, which is being reconstructed into a regulation-size soccer field, the system covers 4,329 linear feet of trenching, 8,658 linear feet of CULTEC Contactor 100 chambers, occupying a surface of area of 59,400 sq. ft. The subsurface chambers are being used for storage and dispersion of sewage effluent as it seeps into the native soils after conventional treatment to recharge the groundwater. In addition, there are approximately 240 linear feet of chambers being used as infiltration rechargers for the surface drainage of the soccer field and to provide nitrogen dilution. All of the chambers were placed on native material, and processed stone was placed above and on the sides of the chambers and topped off with common fill and topsoil. A traditional septic system consists of a solid pipe from the building structure, the septic tank, a drain field and soil treatment. The school’s system is comprised of gravity collection piping from numerous buildings and pretreatment septic tanks. Sewage water flows from the tanks to a centralized effluent pump station and meter pit that doses the CULTEC chambers using an electromagnetic flow meter to regulate valves and the flow controller. These flows are based on preset daily volumes to individual dispersal cells based on real time that is adjusted for temperature change for greater accountability of the flow. The metered flows are transmitted from a data logger to desktop computer and meter software that is customized for the school to obtain greater flow control, operational efficiencies and reporting to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental